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Benetech Delivers 10 Million Accessible Ebooks

2016 September 20

Benetech’s Bookshare technology makes reading possible for over 425,000 individuals unable to read standard print and empowers students and adults to succeed in school, work and social inclusion. 

PALO ALTO, Calif. — September 20, 2016 — Benetech, the leading nonprofit empowering communities in need by creating scalable technology solutions, today announced that over 10 million accessible ebooks have been downloaded through its Bookshare initiative. Bookshare is the world’s largest online library for people who are blind, visually impaired or have a physical disability that interferes with reading, such as dyslexia.10 Million Downloads Image

“Access to information is a basic human right,” said Jim Fruchterman, Founder and CEO of Benetech. “Our Bookshare initiative is focused on using technology to make sure individuals who are unable to read standard print can exercise that right. Today’s milestone is a celebration of what is possible when technology is used for social good.”

Benetech works with over 820 publishers to collect new releases and existing books that are currently unavailable to individuals who cannot read standard print. Bookshare’s technology converts the digital files to accessible formats, including braille, audio, highlighted text and large-font text. Over 425,000 Bookshare members in 70 countries access the growing list of 460,000 titles made available by this technology. The Bookshare library is free for all U.S. students with qualifying print disabilities.

“Bookshare has made a huge difference in my life,” said Brian Meersma, Bookshare member. “I started using Bookshare in middle school. The impact was amazing. I could complete assignments on my own, keep up with my classmates and really excel in school. I now attend Cornell University and help others unlock the power of Bookshare. It’s my hope that all people with reading disabilities such as dyslexia are able to use Bookshare to excel in the classroom and become lifelong learners.”

Today’s announcement is also a call to action for all content to be “Born Accessible.”  Benetech is proud to provide publishers and other content creators with the tools, standards and best practices they need to build accessibility into books when they are first created. While Bookshare is the largest digital library of accessible ebooks, it is estimated that 90 percent of all books are still inaccessible to hundreds of millions of individuals worldwide who are dyslexic, blind, visually impaired or have another physical disability. Benetech is focused on ensuring all content serves everyone equally.

About Benetech

Benetech is a different kind of tech company. We’re a nonprofit whose mission is to empower communities in need by creating scalable technology solutions. Our work has transformed how over 425,000 people with disabilities read; made it safer for human rights defenders in over fifty countries to document human rights violations; and equipped environmental conservationists to protect ecosystems and species all over the world. Our Benetech Labs is working on the next big impact. Visit www.benetech.org.

About Bookshare

Bookshare is the world’s largest online library of accessible ebooks for people with print disabilities. Through its extensive collection of educational and popular titles, specialized book formats, and reading tools, Bookshare offers individuals who cannot read standard print materials the same ease of access that people without disabilities enjoy. In 2007 and 2012, Bookshare received two five-year awards from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), to provide free access for all U.S. students with a qualifying print disability. Bookshare is an initiative of Benetech, a Palo Alto, CA-based nonprofit that develops and uses technology to create positive social change. www.bookshare.org.

Media Contact 

Sara Gebhardt, 650-644-3452

Communications@benetech.org

 

Parent Partners with School Administrators to Advocate for Accessible Ebooks and Dispel Myths

2016 September 14

debbie-campbell-denver-academy

Deborah Campbell with Denver Academy’s Director of Education, Philippe Ernewein, and Director of IT, Anthony Slaughter

When Deborah Campbell volunteered at Denver Academy, she had one mission: to educate teachers and families of children with reading disabilities about the benefits of accessible ebooks and assistive technologies for learning.

Mrs. Campbell holds a master of arts degree in curriculum and instruction and has a deep understanding of the education process. Alyssa, her eldest daughter, attends Denver Academy and was diagnosed with a learning disability in second grade. At that time she read at a noticeably slower pace than her peers, and it was difficult for Deborah to watch Alyssa struggle and see her daughter’s self-esteem diminish.

“I heard about Bookshare at a workshop on technology tools for students with learning disabilities and became a tiger mother,” shared Mrs. Campbell. “I learned about the benefits of using accessible ebooks and how they can support children who cannot read standard print well.”

Alyssa Campbell reading a book from Bookshare on her computer with headphones. As a U.S. student with a learning disability, Alyssa qualified for a free membership to Bookshare. Soon, her reading level advanced and her mom saw a positive transformation in Alyssa’s comprehension skills and behavior.

Mrs. Campbell signed up to be a Bookshare Parent Ambassador, joining a network of parents across the U.S. who advocate in their local schools on behalf of Bookshare as an academic reading solution. She also talked with Denver Academy’s Director of Education and Director of Information Technology who were eager to examine how Bookshare could benefit more students who qualified throughout their campus. They identified a core group of interested administrators, teachers, and families and held discussions about the benefits and misperceptions surrounding the use of accessible ebooks for learning.

Benefits of Accessible Ebooks and Technologies

  1. Increased enjoyment of literature
  2. Support of a child’s intellectual level and personal reading interests
  3. Access to content at all reading levels
  4. Exposure to new vocabulary
  5. Increased comprehension and fluency skills
  6. Reduced time spent on homework
  7. Opportunities to enable real-time note-taking
  8. Enhanced reading engagement through use of personalized technology settings to support reader preferences
  9. Reduced stress and frustration in the reading process
  10. The ability to experience multi-modal reading to see highlighted text and hear it read aloud through text-to-speech capability

Myths Regarding Accessible Ebooks and Technologies

  1. Only print materials should be used in school.
  2. Textbooks and required reading assignments in digital format are hard to find.
  3. Listening to a book is not reading.
  4. Students with reading disabilities will grow out of the disability.
  5. Students don’t like computer voices.
  6. Using technology support for testing is cheating.
  7. Students who use technology have unfair advantages.
  8. It’s too late for older students and adults to try ebooks.
  9. Copyright law prohibits schools from using digital materials.
  10. Setting up a Bookshare membership is complicated.

On the last point, Mrs. Campbell says, “Signing up for Bookshare is straightforward. Just sign up online, print the qualification form, get a school professional or Cover of the Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseiniphysician to sign it, and email or fax the form to Bookshare. Then, log in, search for a title, and either download the ebook to your computer or mobile device or read it directly through the Internet using Bookshare Web Reader. There are no constraints, and the library and some reading tools are free.”

Now in eighth grade, Alyssa reads significantly above grade level, manages her assignments independently, and has developed a true love of literature. She is reading The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini and studies curriculum materials for several classes from the accessible K-12 textbooks assigned to her through Bookshare by her school.

“Accessible ebooks was the right solution for my daughter,” says Mrs. Campbell. “It is sad to know how many parents and educators are still unaware of Bookshare and the benefits of accessible ebooks and technologies to improve a child’s reading ability. Everyone has to approach learning with the tools and strategies that work best for them. If you see a child falling behind or feeling frustrated and overwhelmed, you must seek out alternatives to capture their attention. Don’t stand in the crossroads believing there are no solutions. Learn more about Bookshare and keep exploring thoughts of your child being engaged in the reading process with an ebook and see what happens!”

Back to School Made Easy

back-to-school-made-easy photo collage of students , teachers and bookshelvesBookshare’s online accessible library has over 460,000 titles including textbooks, Common Core materials, educational titles, bestsellers, children’s books, and more. Bookshare is free for qualified U.S. students. To join Bookshare, students must have a qualifying disability that prevents them from reading printed text. Learn more about Bookshare and sign up today!Button that says Learn More and links to the Back to School landing page

Bookshare is an initiative of a technology nonprofit called Benetech and is funded by the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), U.S. Department of Education.

Special thanks to Deborah and Alyssa Campbell for sharing their story.

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Helping Individuals Who Are Blind Transition to Work Through Training and Accessible Ebooks

2016 September 7

September 8th is International Literacy Day, and Bookshare is honoring those individuals and organizations that make a lasting difference to ensure literacy happens for everyone.

Bill Powell provides training for an adult at Bosma Enterprises

Bill Powell provides training for an adult at Bosma Enterprises

Each day, Bill Powell, Assistive Technology Director, and his staff at Bosma Enterprises in Indianapolis, provide job training, employment services, rehabilitation, and outreach to help adults who are blind transition to the working world. To accomplish this goal, the team downloads digital accessible books using Bookshare.

Bill says, “With the right education, mentors, technology, and resources like accessible books, individuals with disabilities are highly capable of working in many fields, including training and technology, after their schooling.”

In 2012, Bill received the Thomas C. Hasbrook Award as a leading advocate for people who are blind or visually impaired.

Accessible Books Are Life Changing

Bill Powell, Salman Haider, Imran Ahmed

Bill Powell with Salman Haider and Imran Ahmed

When asked about successful transitions and talented individuals, Bill points to two colleagues: Salman Haider and Imran Ahmed. Both men, who were born in Pakistan and have visual impairments, are assistive technology trainers. They both experienced childhoods filled with uncertainty due to the lack of academic resources.

“My first eighteen years of schooling were difficult, especially in reading and writing,” says Salman. “In high school, I finally learned about assistive technologies and came to America. “This transition was life changing!”

As an international student studying in the United States, Salman used his technology skills to tap into a network of people and resources. He started to love reading and absorbed knowledge through accessible ebooks and technologies using the Bookshare library. “I found college-level books and computer programming books for my job,” he said. “For any student with vision challenges, finding an accessible textbook that is free and quickly available takes the hassle out of getting books scanned.” Salman also downloads novels, mysteries, and Asian fiction to keep him connected to his heritage. “The library has tons of titles for academia and pleasure reading,” he says. Salman Haider graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Technology from Purdue University.

Imran trains an adult who is blind how to download ebooks from Bookshare

Imran trains an adult who is blind how to download ebooks from Bookshare

Imran Ahmed is an assistive technology trainer at Bosma Enterprises and a longtime Bookshare member. “Before I came to America, I did not have direct access to books,” he says. “When I arrived, signing up for Bookshare was first on my list. I have never been disappointed. The library continues to be a source of unsurpassed knowledge for me professionally and personally.” Imran appreciates that the Bookshare collection continues to expand with international titles, especially South Asian authors which he and his wife enjoy reading together. “We can even download children’s books and read them to our inquisitive toddler,” he says.

Imran also finds technical books he needs to improve his professional skills. “I want to increase my knowledge concerning computers and business acumen,” he adds. “The fact that I can choose whether to read books via speech output or with a braille display makes the library useful and flexible. I read on a DAISY player, a computer, and an iPhone. I teach blind people how to use a computer, navigate the web, utilize resources, and sign up for individual memberships to the library. Bookshare is an integral part of our curriculum.”

As a result of passionate trainers like Bill Powell, Imran Ahmad, and Salman Haider, and organizations like Bosma Enterprises that believe in empowering individuals with disabilities, more persons who are blind and visually impaired are able to make easier transitions from school to work. We thank them for sharing their stories and empowering more people to live fulfilling lives through literacy.

About International Literacy Day

Fifty years ago, UNESCO officially proclaimed September 8 as International Literacy Day to mobilize the international community and promote literacy as an instrument to empower individuals, communities, and societies around the world.

About Bookshare

Bookshare is the world’s largest online library of accessible ebooks for people who cannot read printed books due to blindness, low vision, dyslexia, and other print disabilities. Through Bookshare’s extensive collection of over 450,000 educational, international and popular titles, including K-12 textbooks, specialized book formats, and reading tools, the online library offers the same ease of access that people without disabilities enjoy.

With Bookshare books, members can listen to their book, follow along with highlighted text, read in braille, and customize their experience in ways that make reading easier. Sign up today!

Bookshare is a global literacy initiative of Benetech, a Palo Alto, CA-based nonprofit that develops and uses technology to create positive social change.

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Creating Equal District and Schoolwide Learning Opportunities for Students with Disabilities

2016 August 16

Raising academic performance to meet the mandates of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) is a

Ben Cooper, a student with dyslexia, demonstrates to school administrators how he reads accessible educational ebooks on his tablet.

Ben Cooper, a student with dyslexia, demonstrates to school administrators how he reads accessible educational ebooks on his tablet.

critical mission for school leaders, yet finding solutions to accommodate diverse student populations across districts and schools can be overwhelming and costly.

Students with learning disabilities or visual impairments, for example, have difficulty reading print books. Often, they need accommodations like audio, large print, or braille to make classroom and homework materials accessible.

The effort and resources required to produce accessible educational materials (AEM) is significant. Teachers and librarians struggle to find textbooks and Common Core materials in accessible formats. Parents stress about support for their children. And students who do not get the support they need fall behind in their classwork, sometimes leading to frustration, behavioral issues, and a decline in academic performance that can impact life during and after school.

In U.S. public schools, an estimated 2.4 million students* have a learning disability, like dyslexia. Add to this large population students who are visually or physically impaired, and the goal to provide equal learning opportunities for students with disabilities becomes far reaching for school administrators.  Fortunately, there is a solution.

Bookshare: A Proven, No Cost Reading Solution for U.S. Schools and Districts

To address the needs of students with print disabilities, thousands of U.S. schools and districts have Logo for U.S. Office of Special Education Programs - Ideas that Work signed up for Bookshare, a free resource funded by the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), U.S. Department of Education.

Bookshare is the world’s largest online library of accessible ebooks with over 450,000 titles in accessible formats that lets students read in ways that work for them. Members can listen to words read aloud, follow along with highlighted text, read with large fonts, and read in braille.

With a deep and diverse collection, Bookshare is an invaluable resource for teachers and librarians serving students with disabilities across an entire school or district. They can save precious time and effort getting textbooks, Common Core materials, children’s and young adult books, bestsellers, college prep materials, and more. In so doing, educators can provide equal learning opportunities to students who need reading accommodations.

To join Bookshare, students must have a qualifying print disability that prevents them from reading print books. Qualified U.S. students and schools/districts can sign up for free and unlimited access to Bookshare. They also get free reading tools they can use on computers, Chromebooks, tablets, and smartphones.

Change the Future for More Students Like Laura

“Bookshare has opened a world of knowledge and academic achievement for my daughter and

Judie Gutierrez with Laura, her daughter, who was diagnosed with dyslexia in third grade.

Judie Gutierrez with Laura, her daughter, who was diagnosed with dyslexia in third grade.

thousands like her,” said Judie Gutierrez of Redwood City, California.

Laura Gutierrez dreaded reading. For years her family agonized about her reading decline. Then they discovered accessible ebooks through Bookshare.

“Laura’s comprehension and fluency skills increased,” said her mom. “She is happier and learning. Her teachers say that she is well on her way to grade-level reading. Accessible ebooks changed her future!”

Successful Readers Become High Achievers

School leaders who encourage the use of accessible ebooks to promote reading equality and overall reading skill improvement can make a world of difference academically and socially for more students with print disabilities.

These students will read comprehensively and have a better chance of reading on grade level, reading

This chart highlights Laura Gutierrez's skill improvements in English class from 2012 to 2015 using accessible ebooks to learn.

This chart highlights Laura Gutierrez’s skill improvements in English class from 2012 to 2015 using accessible ebooks to learn.

independently, participating in general education, and reading for a lifetime.

Why not start today by scheduling a discussion with your teaching, special education, and curriculum staff about the value of accessible ebooks and Bookshare?

This online library can be an effective educational resource that administrators, educators, school boards, PTAs, students, and their families can get behind.

*Source: National Center for Learning Disabilities (NCLD)

 

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Benetech Summer Interns Dive Deep into Bookshare

2016 August 10

By guest author Mercedes Mack, Bookshare Operations Associate

Benetech’s Summer Internship Program is now in its fourth year, and with maturity comes evolution.

Benetech summer interns left to right: Cathy Vu, Josephine Kong, Reece Jones, Abhinav Arya, and Justin Yu

Benetech summer interns left to right: Cathy Vu, Josephine Kong, Reece Jones, Abhinav Arya, and Justin Yu

This year we had a mix of high school and college students who worked on Bookshare-related projects with specific focus in two areas: data analysis and member experience. Our interns – Justin Yu, Cathy Vu, Josephine Kong, Abhinav Arya, and Reece Jones – did amazing work for our Bookshare team and were such a delight to work with this summer.

Intern Projects

Justin Yu, an incoming freshman to Santa Clara University, conducted data analysis of our books received by our publisher partners. He searched for trends in download numbers among our different publisher partners to shed more light on what types of books are popular. Justin also input many children’s books into the collection, as well as corrected an astounding amount of metadata inaccuracies in our collection. “My time at Benetech was a unique and enlightening one. Not only did I learn how Bookshare worked and how to proof books, I also had the opportunity to meet and work with a diverse cast of workers, some with disabilities of their own.”

Cathy Vu, a fourth-year student at the University of California, Santa Cruz, conducted data analysis on download trends of the K-12 portion of our Bookshare membership. She found that reading for pleasure has increased through rising download rates of popular titles like The Adventures of Captain Underpants series and The Hunger Games. Cathy also did an excellent job describing images for our children’s picture book requests. Check out If a Bus Could Talk to read some of her beautiful descriptions. “Benetech embodies the phrase ‘work hard, play hard.’ Being a part of Benetech has been the most rewarding part of my summer.”

Josephine Kong is a senior at Saint Francis High School in Mountain View. She evaluated Bookshare’s efficacy and exposure in the dyslexic community. She also evaluated Bookshare’s Web Reader and other reading tools to determine how helpful they are to dyslexic readers. Her thorough research into this bridge serves as a foundation for Bookshare staff as we continue to expand our connection with the dyslexic community. Josephine led the efforts in replacing many of the outdated titles in the Bookshare collection sourced from Project Guttenberg. She replaced 267 titles with newer EPUB3 versions for an improved reading experience. “I can confidently say that I was able to use my skills to make a difference for others because I was able to learn and thrive in Benetech’s welcoming environment.”

Abhinav Arya is a sophomore at Bellarmine College Preparatory in San Jose. He did a comprehensive evaluation of Bookshare’s Help Center. His thoughtful and well-researched recommendations on layout, content, and function gave us valuable insight into the future possibilities of the Help Center. Abhinav also did valuable work on the Project Guttenberg project, as well as fixing metadata inaccuracies in the collection. “This internship has provided me with valuable workplace experience and insight into accessibility. I enjoyed working on multiple projects and collaborating with the other interns.”

Reece Jones is a senior at Lowell High School in San Francisco. He evaluated our current methods of making content accessible in house specifically using the children’s chapter book series Geronimo Stilton. Bookshare has many of the titles in the series; however, they are not accessible to our visually-impaired members. Reece was able to identify key areas for improvement in our scanning and proofing processes. And because of his work, we hope to add some accessible Geronimo Stilton titles in the future. “This being my first experience in the work force, it was very rewarding to realize that the work we’ve done here won’t just stop; it’s going to go on to help students across the world for years to come.”

Our interns added tremendous value to our organization through their project work, fresh perspective, and diligent work ethic. They will certainly be missed, and we wish them much success in their academic pursuits.

 

Brave Means Learning How To Defy The Odds

2016 July 26
Rosdom and his family

Rosdom and his family

Our son, Rosdom, is very smart and brave. We recognized these characteristics early in his childhood, but we also saw some unusual behavior that held clues that he would not grow up as a typical child.

In preschool, specialists told us that Rosdom would not be able to read, write, or function socially. This information led to many exhausting nights and conversations with teachers, researchers, scientists, and parents who live with similar circumstances. We worried about his education and future. We explored learning environments, resources, and strategies to support children with multiple disabilities. We found Bookshare and assistive technologies.

Accessible Ebooks and Technology with Text-to-Speech Help Rosdom to Excel Academically

In third grade, with a diagnosis of dyslexia and autism, Rosdom was placed in special education. He was given an Individual Education Program (IEP) with reading accommodations. This included an individual membership to Bookshare which enabled him to receive educational materials in digital accessible format and read them with assistive technology devices.

I must thank the reading tutors and a teacher’s aide who learned about Bookshare and text-to-speech. This capability empowered our son to quickly distill information at and above his grade level with his sharp comprehension and recall skills. Through text-to-speech he could reread and relisten to information through highlighted words on screen accompanied by audio. His comprehension soared! By fourth grade, Rosdom did all his own coursework independently, including assignments in literature and history, two of his favorite subjects, in addition to mathematics.

Rosdom receiving a Presidential Award at eighth grade graduation. This award is given to students with As in all classes for all three years.

Rosdom receiving a Presidential Award at eighth grade graduation. This award is given to students with As in all classes for all three years.

By ninth grade, he took honors classes and received high grades. His ACT scores placed him in the upper 25% to attend a top-ranking college and he now speaks of attending the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. We also just learned that an essay he wrote on To Kill a Mockingbird was chosen as a finalist in the Facing History and Ourselves contest at his school. This is a wonderful accomplishment for a child with neurotypical issues.

Today, I’m Brave Campaign – Rosdom’s Social Skills

On the social side, our son is now a brand ambassador for the Today, I’m Brave campaign, a heart-centered, socially-driven experiment that celebrates people performing brave acts every day. He has many friends. He studies Japanese and talks of becoming a writer, living in Japan, and working in the gaming industry. He loves to read Shakespeare and manga, a form of Japanese comic books, which he finds in Bookshare.

Our journey has not been easy. Over many years, Rosdom recognized his challenges and fought to not be different. Through the Today, I’m Brave campaign, he wants kids to know that you don’t just succeed with sheer luck, but with support and high expectations from parents and teachers, and with praise and access to resources, like Bookshare and technologies. To parents like us, we say, “Do not give up hope. Your child, like our son, now eighteen, can be destined to accomplish great things.”

Rosdom holding a card that says, "Today I’m Brave"

Rosdom holding a card that says, “Today I’m Brave”

A Note from Rosdom Kaligian  

I produced the Today, I’m Brave video because I want more kids to know that while dyslexia is a pest, it is not a death sentence and does not have to define who you are. You can still excel in school and life.

To readers of this blog, I want you to know that I am smart and determined. I would like to hear more teachers and parents say to people, like me, who are different, “Wow, you had a lot of obstacles in your path, but you found ways to get beyond them and truly excel.” It would be great to hear these words of praise more often!

P.S. Today, Rosdom’s video has more than 13,561 views!

Special thanks to Barbara-Seda Aghamianz and Rosdom Kaligian for sharing their personal journey.

Sign Up for Bookshare Now… Before Back to School Begins!

Bookshare is the world’s largest online library of accessible ebooks for people who cannot read printed books due to blindness, low vision, dyslexia, and other print disabilities.

Through Bookshare’s extensive collection of educational and popular titles, including K-12 textbooks, specialized book formats, and reading tools, the online library offers individuals who cannot read standard print materials the same ease of access that people without disabilities enjoy.

We encourage all parents of children with print disabilities to learn more about Bookshare and sign up for an individual membership. In addition, let your child’s teachers know about Bookshare so they can sign up the school for an organizational membership. Both memberships are free for qualified U.S. students and schools.

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Reading Takes Discipline and My Fear of the Written Word Is Gone

2016 July 19
by Bookshare Guest
Davis Graham at his work desk surrounded by computer screens and tech devices.

Davis Graham at his work desk surrounded by computer screens and tech devices.

People will tell you that I like to consume information, but that was not always the case. For most of my life, I struggled with reading so badly I never thought I would be scholarly or have a successful career, but my fear of the printed word is no longer present. Once I discovered accessible books with reading technologies, my life changed. Bookshare is one of the resources that gave me a competitive edge.

Today, in my fifties, I will graduate from Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts, with a Master of Science in Health and Medical Informatics. The faculty will honor me as the student marshal for my class. This prestigious recognition is given to a student who goes beyond coursework to help their community. I tutor children with dyslexia and teach them about assistive technology. I talk with their parents about Bookshare.

I only wish the online accessible library had existed and my family had known about it when I was a child. If not for my parents, a few teachers, and my faith, I would not have the courage to write about myself today.

Dyslexia – Years of Hidden Pain

I know a thing or two about this learning disability. My childhood was filled with difficult memories. At eight years old, I was diagnosed with dyslexia. I read slowly and poorly with almost no comprehension. It was frightening and debilitating. It raged a storm inside of me that almost knocked me down. I was suspended in school for bad behavior. I built up walls and pushed people away. I felt unworthy.

Some research studies suggest a correlation between depression and people with learning disabilities. People may show signs of withdrawal, aggression, poor self-concept, and unsatisfactory peer relations.

To parents and teachers, I say explore accessible resources and accommodations for your children. Try listening to words read aloud through digital accessible books and seeing them highlighted on a screen. This capability enables me to comprehend more content. I am able to keep pace in the learning process and be measured by my abilities rather than my lack of literacy skills.

Book Cover of The Preacher and the Presidents - Billy Graham in the White House, Nancy Gibbs and Michael DuffyMy First Accessible Book

I remember downloading my first book from Bookshare in 2007, The Preacher and the Presidents, a story of Reverend Billy Graham by Nancy Gibbs and Michael Duffy. In the book, Graham is reading, The World is Flat by Thomas Freidman. This was the second book I read.

Since that time, I have read hundreds of accessible ebooks, of all types, from novels and scientific health journals to religion, academia, and career development. My Bookshare membership allows me to take full advantage of the online library’s vast collection of over 446,000 titles, thanks to over eight hundred publishers who contribute their digital files to the library.

Reading Takes Discipline

I am the Executive Director of a diagnostic and radiology center in Florida. My responsibilities are to review contracts, oversee a large staff, monitor and manage purchasing, and execute strategic plans. I also work with a technical team. We are developing an app for physicians to receive patient diagnostic reports in real time. I learned how to develop an app using an iOS application book for dummies from Bookshare. I think my tech team really respected that.

For me, reading is a discipline. When I get ready to read a hefty contract or document, I gear up and focus on the task. To comprehend the context, I use Voice Dream Reader and am grateful to Winston Chen, the developer of the application. This reading tool is so easy to use with Bookshare.

Wonderful Feeling to Be Hooked on Knowledge!

It is a wonderful feeling to be hooked on knowledge and to know how really smart we can become.  Digital accessible books and technologies have given me this freedom.  To people living with a print disability, young or older, I say, fuel your passions and interests using digital accessible books and technologies. Your life will be more meaningful. There is nothing that can stand in your way, except your own motivation.

Special thanks to Davis Graham for sharing his personal story.

 

About Bookshare

Bookshare is the world’s largest online library of accessible ebooks for people with print disabilities. Through its extensive collection of educational and popular titles, specialized book formats, and reading tools, Bookshare offers individuals who cannot read standard print materials the same ease of access that people without disabilities enjoy. In 2007 and 2012, Bookshare received two five-year awards from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), to provide free access for all U.S. students with a qualifying print disability. The Bookshare library now has over 446,000 books and serves more than 400,000 members. Bookshare is an initiative of Benetech, a Palo Alto, CA-based nonprofit that develops and uses technology to create positive social change.

 

 

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Have You Caught the Bookshare Bingo Fever?

2016 July 12

Bingo Header_3

Summer is the perfect time to catch up on all those books you have been meaning to read. It’s not too late to join our fun summer reading activity: Bookshare Bingo. The game of Bingo is believed to have originated in the 1920s by Hugh J. Ward who introduced it at carnivals around Pittsburgh and in Western Pennsylvania.

Book cover for Tesla's Attic by Neal Shusterman and Eric ElfmanToday, there are more versions of bingo than you can count, and our version involves reading at least five books that correspond to five categories in a row, column, or diagonal to get a bingo. Then you submit your Bingo card and get a special gift while supplies last.Book cover for 10,000 Days of Thunder by Philip Caputo

Many members have already submitted bingo cards. Here are just a few of the captivating books that they have been enjoying this summer:

Book cover for Dandelion Fire by ND WilsonNeed some ideas? Our staff has prepared Book cover for 15 Sports Myths and Why They're Wrong by Rodney Fort and Jason Winfreesummer reading lists for children, middle school students, teens, and adults. Dive in and see which titles intrigue you, or find your own books. Then all you need is a comfy chair, hammock, beach towel, or cozy bed so you can settle in with a good book. Let Bookshare unlock the door to a summer filled with reading. Catch the Bookshare Bingo fever!

Button that says Learn More

 

Indiana Assistive Technology Expert Finds “Gem” in Bookshare

2016 July 6

Special thanks to Laura Medcalf  for her contribution to the Bookshare blog. We appreciate the mission of the Indiana Assistive Technology Act (INDATA) Project and Laura’s “on the record” testimonial. 

Laura in a sound-proof studio front of a microphone ready to record a podcast.“When you read my blog or listen to my podcasts for the Indiana Assistive Technology Act Project (INDATA), you will notice a common theme. I focus on one form of disability or assistive technology that benefits individuals with a single disability (e.g., visual impairment, hearing loss, autism, etc.).

Assistive technology is my passion and my goal is to educate Indiana patrons (“Go Hoosiers!”) and readers across the world who are interested in quality assistive technology resources.

“The term ‘assistive technology device’ means any item, piece of equipment, or product system, whether acquired commercially off the shelf, modified, or customized, that is used to increase, maintain, or improve the functional capabilities of individuals with disabilities.” –Assistive Technology Act of 1998Sometimes, through my research, I discover a resource that is a true gem because it can substantially and positively impact thousands of individuals with a myriad of disabilities, and Bookshare is one such gem.

The online accessible library combined with reading tools and apps are what I refer to as “evergreen” in the assistive technology world. The resource stands the test of time with a history of innovation and services that are more relevant and beneficial today, especially in educating K-12 youth and post-secondary students who qualify.

Six Reasons I Recommend Bookshare:

  1. Bookshare’s mission and functionality fit the description of what AT is meant to accomplish: improving the functional capabilities of people with disabilities.
  2. Bookshare benefits persons of all ages with print disabilities, including those who are blind or visually impaired, or those who have a physical or learning disability.
  3. The library helps people with print disabilities become independent and self-reliant.
  4. The collection has an abundance of digital accessible titles to satisfy diverse interests from academic to professional and self-development to leisure.
  5. Members can read accessible ebooks with various reading tools and apps to accommodate many learning and reader preferences.
  6. Membership is free for U.S. schools and students who qualify.

My longtime respect for Bookshare continues as does my hope that more people with print disabilities can truly enjoy a universal and equitable reading experience. I will continue to cover the evolution and benefits of the online library in my blogs and podcasts as I truly believe it can help to remove barriers so that more individuals can be recognized for their abilities rather than their disabilities. Giving the gift of this reading resource is truly a gem of an opportunity and we can all celebrate that.”

Learn More with link

About Bookshare

Visit the Bookshare website to sign up as an organization if you represent a U.S. school. For parents or caregivers, you can sign a child up for an individual membership. Both options are free for U.S. students who qualify. There is a minimal annual subscription for non-student and international members.

INDATA and Easter Seals Crossroads logoAbout Laura Medcalf and INDATA

Laura Medcalf studied special education and creative writing at Ball State University. She is responsible for researching and writing content for INDATA and hosting the Accessibility Minute Podcast, a sixty-second podcast covering everything on accessibility which airs on Fridays.

Easter Seals Crossroads has been providing assistive technology solutions in Indiana since 1979. In 2007, it partnered with the State of Indiana, Bureau of Rehabilitative Services, to establish the Indiana Assistive Technology Act (INDATA) Project. Core services include: information and referral, funding assistance, public awareness and education, device demonstration, device loan, and re-utilized computers and equipment. The project is one of fifty-six similar federally-funded projects designed to increase access to and awareness of assistive technology.  To find a similar project in another US state or territory, visit: www.RESNAProjects.org.

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